Task-Based Language Teaching: What Does It Really Mean?

If you Google Task-Based Language Teaching, or TBLT, you’ll find a lot of definitions related to the latest trend in teaching second or foreign languages. But what does it really mean?

TBLT is an approach to language learning that was popularized in the 1980s by N. Prabhu in Bangalore, India. Prabhu discovered that learners were able to learn more effectively when they were focused on a tangible, non-linguistic task like reading a map, than when they were focused on a linguistic task such as using second conditional verb forms.

Similarly, learning a language at its core is simply learning a new skill. And just like any other skill—playing the piano or swimming, for instance—you learn by doing. The sooner you start playing music or jumping into the pool, the sooner you’ll start learning and practicing the skills you need to play an entire song or swim the breaststroke. In contrast, studying music theory or reading a book about swimming techniques may be insightful, but it probably won’t help you achieve your real goal as quickly and efficiently as possible.

TBLT is centered on meaningful tasks using target language (the language being learned) in real-life situations, as opposed to focusing on the target language on its own without any relatable or concrete context. Examples of tasks can range from scheduling a doctor’s appointment and filing a complaint with customer service to answering job interview questions and using small talk with colleagues. TBLT prepares learners for real-world situations, while traditional language teaching that focuses on target language in isolation will not, like a lesson on the past perfect of the verb “to be.” You can easily draw examples of the traditional approach to language learning from your own experience: your high school Spanish teacher may have had you complete irregular verb conjugation exercises instead of role-playing ordering food in a restaurant and applying the target language to a real-life situation. With TBLT, you will never wonder why you’re learning a specific verb tense or set of expressions. The reason will always be related to a real-life situation that is crystal clear to you from the start.

From a language learner’s perspective, a TBLT approach means that your goals and real-life outcomes for learning a new language—whether you want to easily communicate abroad in a country where the language is spoken or work at an international company—should guide your decision when choosing a course, software or tutor. Never lose sight of your goals along the way. For example, if you plan on traveling abroad to Spain and want to learn some Spanish to help you get around, focus on the types of interactions and situations you expect to experience in Spain. Think of common tasks such as asking for directions, ordering food in a restaurant, reading a menu and checking in to a hotel. Don’t spend too much time focusing on language that falls outside of these interactions as it won’t pertain to your experience. And because that language isn’t relevant to your goals, it may discourage you from sticking with it. You don’t need to learn how to describe someone’s eye color (Bob tiene ojos marrones) or learn the comparative in Spanish (El gato corre más rápido que el perro), but you do need to know how to politely ask for information (Disculpe, sabe cómo llegar a la estación de tren?) or how to tell a server that you are a vegetarian (Soy vegetariana. No como carne ni pescado.). This way, you’ll actually be prepared for your trip, you’ll save time and you’ll stay motivated!

More often than not, language learners do not assess their goals when they embark upon the brave journey of learning a new language. They assume that any one-size-fits-all solution will work for their specific needs, but everyone’s goals are different and TBLT acknowledges this as critical to success. If you’re learning English to improve your career versus learning English because you’ll be traveling to New York, the language you’ll need is different. So how could the same exact course help you achieve two very different goals? Instead of choosing a static course designed as a catch-all solution, choose one that is customizable and adaptive based on your unique goals—a task-based and personalized solution.

Mari Nazary is Voxy's VP of Pedagogy and Curriculum.

Mari Nazary is Voxy’s VP of Pedagogy and Curriculum.

Naomi Sveholm: What a Toddler Can Teach Us about Language Acquisition

Naomi with SonWhen my son was born, I was excited to interact with him (after some sleep, that is). We’ve been communicating his whole life, but his speaking didn’t really take off until he was around 16 months, when I noticed a lot of parallels between my son and my English students, some of which matched my own experiences learning other languages.

English learners, take heart! It’s not easy to learn another language, and even native speakers have trouble at first. Here are some tips for communication, inspired by a toddler but helpful for all language learners.

Listening and Pronunciation

Learning vocabulary only by listening is hard
It always helps me to see a word in addition to hearing it. But it does sound awfully cute to hear my son ask to hear “siwik” (music) or eat “granbabies” (cranberries).

Certain sounds are hard to produce, but they don’t have to be perfect
TH, L/R and consonant clusters, particularly those with L/R—think GReen, BLue, TRain and ice CReam—are especially difficult. My son says the word “bathroom” like “bahfum,” but it’s pretty close and easy to understand. He also says “uncle” like “unco,” which is a great substitute for an L at the end of a word. W in place of an R at the beginning of a word is also an okay substitute if you’re having trouble (“wooster” instead of “rooster”).

Your pronunciation improves with practice
This is probably a given, but you will improve as you practice. For my son, “boo” has become “boobewy” (which will someday become “blueberry”), and “suss” has become “horse.” It doesn’t happen overnight, but if you keep listening and practice speaking, your sounds will improve.

Helpful Cues to Help Others Understand You

Gestures and sound effects help
I never would have known that my son was asking for help unless he had used the ASL (American Sign Language) gesture, because when he said the word “help” it sounded just like “up.” He also made an elephant “brrr” noise well before he could say “elephant,” and he regularly points or otherwise indicates objects. Use what you have, even if you feel silly.

Context is everything
“Bunny,” “banana” and “button” sound almost identical when my son says them, but it’s often clear which one he means based on the context—if he’s playing, eating (or if he’s hungry) or touching someone’s shirt, for example. Similarly, don’t expect your teacher to know what word you want to say unless you share more information or the rest of the sentence.

Be creative
If you don’t know a word, substitute something as close in meaning as possible. I was tickled when my son, at about 10 months old, called the wind “fan.” And because he loves vehicles, he called everything “car” for a long time.

A little “please” goes a long way
People (including tired parents) are much more patient when you’re polite. In fact, people will often go out of their way to help. With a few polite words in your arsenal, you can feel much more confident simply because people will be more receptive.

General Tips for Studying

Read…a lot!
At 19 months, my son called a penny “shiny” and his diaper changing pad “squashy.” To the best of my knowledge, he has only encountered those two words in books. He has learned many words for vehicles as well as many sound words, and I often see him reading books on his own, pointing to pictures and saying words. Reading is one of the best ways to learn vocabulary and grammar.

Pay attention
Anything is an opportunity to practice, including hearing an airplane fly overhead or a radio story about big cats. It’s best to read or listen to things that are at or just above your level, because the more you understand, the more energy you have to pay attention, but even something well above your level can help.

Learning a language takes a lot of energy, but confidence comes as much from feeling competent as it does from actual language ability. By using all of your resources, you’ll have the confidence to interact with others. And that’s when it really gets fun!

Naomi Sveholm is a Voxy tutor.

Naomi Sveholm is a Voxy tutor.

Clothes Idioms of the week

Idioms of the week: clothes

In this blog series, we’re breaking down common English expressions that are used in everyday conversation, so you’ll be able to expand your language skills and have fun with new English phrases. This week, we’re keeping to the theme of clothes.

1. old-fashioned (noun phrase): of or relating to the past
Ex: Vintage clothes are making a come-back: I saw a young girl wearing a white, old-fashioned dress in the street this morning.

2. dressed to the nines (verb phrase): to be dressed elegantly, to be dressed very well
Ex: It was a beautiful wedding, everybody was dressed to the nines.

3. put oneself in somebody else’s shoes (verb phrase): imagine what it would be like to be in someone else’s situation
Ex: Stop complaining and try to put yourself in my shoes for once!

4. hit someone below the belt (verb phrase): to do something in an unfair or cowardly way
Ex: Mike is usually a nice guy, but his last comment on John’s questionable work ethics really hit below the belt.

5. do (something) like it is going out of fashion (verb phrase): enthusiastically, to an extensive degree
Ex: Tom is eating his burger like it’s going out of fashion—he is going to get sick!

6. fit like a glove (verb phrase): fit perfectly
Ex: This dress fits you like a glove, you should buy it!

7. fall apart at the seams (verb phrase): in a very bad condition, likely to fail
Ex: I quit my old company because it was falling apart at the seams.

8. hot under the collar (noun phrase): very angry
Ex: He got very hot under the collar when the waiter spilled a drink on him.

9. roll up one’s sleeves (verb phrase): prepare for hard work
Ex: Everyone had to roll up their sleeves to meet the client’s demanding request.

10. cut from the same cloth (verb phrase): of the same nature, similar
Ex: She and her mother are cut from the same cloth, their personalities are so similar.

Try using these idioms the next time you practice your English skills. You’ll find yourself using them more naturally in conversation in no time!

G20 summit

Coffee Break: 10 Expressions About… the 2016 G20 Hangzhou Summit

Next week, leaders from the 20 most powerful countries in the world will gather in Hangzhou, China, to take part in the eleventh G20 summit. If you’re interested in politics, international affairs or just want to expand your vocabulary list, here are 10 words and expressions related to this international forum that may be useful to know:

1. policy (noun): course or principle of action adopted or proposed by a government, party, business or individual
Ex: For this year’s G20 Summit, there is great anticipation for policies that can support economic growth.

2. agenda (noun): a list of items to be discussed at a formal meeting
Ex: Themes such as innovation, sustainable development and anti-corruption policies are all on the official agenda of the G20 summit.

3. globalization (noun): the development of closer economic, cultural and political relations among all the countries of the world as a result of travel and communication becoming easy
Ex: Because of globalization, there’s an increased need for international cooperation among countries.

4. guidelines (plural noun): rules or instructions that show or tell how something should be done
Ex: At the end of the summit, new international economic guidelines should be put into place and followed by every participating country.

5. endorsement (noun): the act of making a public statement of your support for something or someone
Ex: Before being officially released, some international standards need to receive an endorsement from the G20 leaders.

6. to issue a statement (phrase): to publicly say something, especially formally and officially
Ex: The Chinese government issued a statement declaring that all Hangzhou markets will stay open during the two-day G20 summit.

7. framework (noun): the ideas, information and principles that form the structure of an organization or plan
Ex: The relationship between Russia and China is based on a framework of mutual cooperation that has proven to be effective for both countries.

8. green finance (noun): refers to finding a balance between environmental protection, investment and financing
Ex: Since the mayor decided to invest part of the budget in the protection of biodiversity and landscapes in the city, the counsel really started to embrace the concept of green finance.

9. sustainable development (noun): economic development that is conducted without depletion of natural resources
Ex: Solar energy, wind energy and crop rotation are all examples of sustainable development.

10. consensus (noun): general agreement
Ex: The G20 is large enough to capture a wide range of interests from all systemic economies, and small enough to forge a consensus on critical issues for the world economy.

The expressions and examples we chose to write about in this article are a bit harder than usual! Take your time and maybe even read the article two or three times to make sure you understand each word. Then, try using them in a sentence on your own. Good luck!


Idioms of the Week: Health

In this blog series, we’re breaking down common English expressions that are used in everyday conversation, so you’ll be able to expand your language skills and have fun with new English phrases. This week, we’re keeping to the theme of health.

1. bitter pill to swallow (noun phrase): an unpleasant fact one must accept

Ex. Losing the highly competitive presidential election was a bitter pill to swallow for the once-revered candidate.

2. as fit as a fiddle (adjective phrase): to be healthy and physically fit

Ex. Despite being nearly eighty years old, Tom is as fit as a fiddle.

3. back on one’s feet (noun phrase): to regain one’s physical health again

Ex. With the help of antibiotics to treat her flu symptoms, Melanie is back on her feet.

4. bundle of nerves (adjective phrase): used to describe a very nervous or anxious person

Ex. Because she was scared of flying, Denise was a bundle of nerves during the whole plane flight.

5. burn (oneself) out (verb phrase): to become emotionally and physically tired from doing something for a long term

Ex. After working continuous ten hour shifts as a waitress, she was totally burned out.

6. clean bill of health (noun phrase): a statement or assessment that someone is healthy

Ex. My doctor gave me a clean bill of health when I visited him for my annual physical exam.

7. green around the gills (adjective phrase): used to describe someone who looks sick and nauseated

Ex. After a tumultuous rollercoaster ride, Cindy was green around the gills.

8. bun in the oven (noun phrase): used to describe someone who is pregnant

Ex. When Sharon returned from her honeymoon, she had a bun in the oven.

9. break out in a cold sweat (verb phrase): to perspire from nervousness or anxiety

Ex. Dan broke out in a cold sweat upon learning of the surprise pop quiz in math class.

10. breathe one’s last (noun phrase): to die

Ex. Despite fighting a chronic illness for years, the ninety-year-old man breathed his last.

Try using these idioms the next time you practice your English skills. You’ll find yourself using them more naturally in conversation in no time!